Face mask orders expire/lifted in Baltimore-area counties – WBAL TV Baltimore

Face mask orders are expiring or are being lifted in Baltimore-area counties, but not in schools.Video above: Experts now recommend N95 masks to combat omicronBaltimore County’s indoor face mask order will expire Tuesday and it will not be extended, county officials told 11 News. The county’s COVID-19 state of emergency that was tied to the mask order will expire as scheduled on Feb. 7.While the county’s mask mandate will expire Tuesday, Baltimore County Public Schools issued a statement saying face masks will still be required inside all school buildings and offices as required by the Maryland State Department of Education. Additionally, the Baltimore County Public Library announced masks are still required at its branches.County Executive Johnny Olszewski released a statement Monday afternoon citing declining COVID-19 metrics, saying: “We are strongly encouraged by the progress we’ve seen in recent days and remain cautiously optimistic that we are emerging from this omicron wave.Olszewski further urged residents to get vaccinated.”The best way to continue our progress is for every resident to protect themselves, their loved ones, and our community by getting vaccinated and boosted as soon as possible,” Olszewski said. “Moving forward, we will continue to closely monitor key metrics and remain prepared to take whatever steps are necessary to protect public health.”When enacting the order last month, officials said the omicron variant was challenging efforts to combat the coronavirus pandemic, and that’s why putting masks on makes such a difference.According to the county executive’s office, Baltimore County has seen decreases in recent weeks in major COVID metrics, as follows.Since Jan. 3, Baltimore County’s positivity rate has decreased by nearly 80%. Since Jan. 3, Baltimore County’s average positivity rate has decreased by nearly 80%. Since Jan. 11, the average number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients in Baltimore County has decreased by nearly 50%.County employees and the general public will continue to be required to wear masks inside all county offices and facilities.Anne Arundel County’s mask order expired Monday.In Harford County, County Executive Barry Glassman announced Monday that he will lift the mask requirement for visitors in county government buildings and for county employees who interact with the public starting Tuesday.Harford County Public Schools said Tuesday that masks are still required indoors and on school buses in compliance with the Maryland State Board of Education.In Howard County, County Executive Calvin Ball on Tuesday signed an executive order to immediately lift the county’s mask mandate.Howard County public buildings and facilities, and public transit, including the RTA, will still require masks. Businesses and organizations may still require masking at their own discretion.Howard County’s positivity rate is at 8.47% — a 70% decrease from its peak. The county’s case rate per 100,000 is 34 — an 83% decrease from its peak — and its hospitalizations have decreased by 60%, according to the county executive’s office.

Face mask orders are expiring or are being lifted in Baltimore-area counties, but not in schools.

Video above: Experts now recommend N95 masks to combat omicron

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Baltimore County’s indoor face mask order will expire Tuesday and it will not be extended, county officials told 11 News. The county’s COVID-19 state of emergency that was tied to the mask order will expire as scheduled on Feb. 7.

While the county’s mask mandate will expire Tuesday, Baltimore County Public Schools issued a statement saying face masks will still be required inside all school buildings and offices as required by the Maryland State Department of Education. Additionally, the Baltimore County Public Library announced masks are still required at its branches.

County Executive Johnny Olszewski released a statement Monday afternoon citing declining COVID-19 metrics, saying: “We are strongly encouraged by the progress we’ve seen in recent days and remain cautiously optimistic that we are emerging from this omicron wave.

Olszewski further urged residents to get vaccinated.

“The best way to continue our progress is for every resident to protect themselves, their loved ones, and our community by getting vaccinated and boosted as soon as possible,” Olszewski said. “Moving forward, we will continue to closely monitor key metrics and remain prepared to take whatever steps are necessary to protect public health.”

When enacting the order last month, officials said the omicron variant was challenging efforts to combat the coronavirus pandemic, and that’s why putting masks on makes such a difference.

According to the county executive’s office, Baltimore County has seen decreases in recent weeks in major COVID metrics, as follows.

  • Since Jan. 3, Baltimore County’s positivity rate has decreased by nearly 80%.
  • Since Jan. 3, Baltimore County’s average positivity rate has decreased by nearly 80%.
  • Since Jan. 11, the average number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients in Baltimore County has decreased by nearly 50%.

County employees and the general public will continue to be required to wear masks inside all county offices and facilities.

Anne Arundel County’s mask order expired Monday.

In Harford County, County Executive Barry Glassman announced Monday that he will lift the mask requirement for visitors in county government buildings and for county employees who interact with the public starting Tuesday.

Harford County Public Schools said Tuesday that masks are still required indoors and on school buses in compliance with the Maryland State Board of Education.

In Howard County, County Executive Calvin Ball on Tuesday signed an executive order to immediately lift the county’s mask mandate.

Howard County public buildings and facilities, and public transit, including the RTA, will still require masks. Businesses and organizations may still require masking at their own discretion.

Howard County’s positivity rate is at 8.47% — a 70% decrease from its peak. The county’s case rate per 100,000 is 34 — an 83% decrease from its peak — and its hospitalizations have decreased by 60%, according to the county executive’s office.

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